2018 Race Guidelines

on .

 

SAILBOAT RACING AND COMMITTEE BOAT GUIDELINES

Table of Contents

Overview

Handicap

Committee Boat

Course Set-up

Race Operations (Self-Timed)

Race Operations (RC Timed)

Rules

Rule Chart Illustration

Penalties

After Race

Appendix A Portsmouth Yardstick Numbers

Appendix B Performance Handicap Racing Fleet Numbers

Appendix C Modification Factors for Non-factory Standard Boats

Overview

The Spindrift Sailing Club host a spring and fall sailboat racing series for its club members. The sailboats are typically a cruising style monohull of varying length and design. The boats are handicapped to equalize performance and adjusting timed results. See Handicap section for more information. The crew is made up of a club member captain and any number of addition club and non-club member crew. The club encourages sailors of all experience levels who are not racing their own boat to join in the fun and racing captains to accept them as crew.

The sailboat racing is a great source of fun, learning and competitive experiences for all who join in and the top three captains are awarded at the end of each racing series and the overall top finisher for the year.

The sailboat racing is governed by a Vice Commodore of Racing which is voted in by club members each year and the help from a volunteer racing committee made up of racing captains and crew. Each racing captain is expected to volunteer or serve when picked on racing committee. See Committee Boat section for more information.

The race courses are set-up prior to each race day by the racing committee. The course layout can vary from race day to race day. See Course Set-up section for more information.

The safety of each boat and its crew shall the highest priority and each racing captain will ensure their boat follows not only the rules of the road, but the US Sailing Association Rules for Racing as well. The race committee boat will handle starting / finishing line timing and rule infractions unless the race is self-timed in which case the honor system applies. All other rule fractions will be assessed by the racing captains during the race by using the honor system. All contested rules infractions will be addressed by the Vice Commodore of Racing after the races are complete. See Rules section for more information.

The Rear Commodore will host a mini social after each race day races for racers and club members. The club will provide picnic type entrée and attendees are encouraged to bring sides.

Handicap

The racing fleet is made up a wide variety of cruising style mono-hulls of varying length and design. The Spindrift Sailing Club uses the Portsmouth Yardstick D-PN numbers. See Appendix A.

The Portsmouth Yardstick' (PY) or Portsmouth handicap scheme is a term used for a number of related systems of empirical handicapping used primarily in small sailboat racing.

The handicap is applied to the time taken to sail any course, and the handicaps can be used with widely differing types sailboats. Portsmouth Numbers are updated with data from race results, normally annually. The various schemes are not directly linked, and ratings for the same class can and often do vary in the different schemes.

The most prominent Portsmouth Yardstick systems are probably those administered in the United States by the Portsmouth Numbers Committee. The PY may not have a D-PN for every boat within the racing fleet. The Performance Handicap Racing Fleet PHRF numbers will be used to derived the D-PN number. See Appendix B.

Performance Handicap Racing Fleet (PHRF) is a handicapping system used for yacht racing in North America. It allows dissimilar classes of sailboats to be raced against each other. The aim is to cancel out the inherent advantages and disadvantages of each class of boats, so that results reflect crew skill rather than equipment superiority.

PHRF is used mainly for larger sailboats (i.e., 7 meters and above). For dinghy racing, the Portsmouth yardstick handicapping system is more likely to be used.

The handicap number assigned to a class of yachts is based on the yacht's speed relative to a theoretical yacht with a rating of 0. A yacht's handicap, or rating, is the number of seconds per mile traveled that the yacht in question should be behind the theoretical yacht. Most boats have a positive PHRF rating, but some very fast boats have a negative PHRF rating. If Boat A has a PHRF rating of 15 and Boat B has a rating of 30 and they compete on a 1-mile course, Boat A should finish approximately 15 seconds in front of Boat B. Results are adjusted for handicap by the race committee after all competitors have finished.

Conversions between different Systems

USA - D-PN and PHRF

There is a linear correlation between the D-PN and PHRF, allowing the following conversion formulae:

D-PN = ( PHRF / 6 ) + 55

PHRF = ( D-PN − 55 ) × 6

All boats in the racing fleet that have been modified from the factory standard configuration to improve their sailing performance will have modification factors to adjust their handicap number.

Any boat in the racing fleet that has been modified from the factory standard configuration and it reduces their sailing performance can have modification factors adjust their handicap number.

Committee Boat

Redbud Marina allows the sail club to use one of its pontoon boats to serve as the race committee boat. The race committee boat Captain should ask for boat operation instruction from the marina staff if they are unfamiliar with the pontoon boat operation.

The committee boat Captain should check the fuel and engine oil level prior to leaving the dock.

Race Day Timing

The races start as close to 1:00PM as possible. The following is a time guideline to help you meet the start time:

9:00AM Move committee boat to the end of dock six.

9:15AM Locate buoys, anchors, buoy bobber weights, boat mooring ball with anchor, air blower and signal flags from the lockers at the end of dock six.

9:30AM Inflate buoys (do not over fill) and attach anchor rode with bobber weights four feet below buoy attachment.

10:00AM Leave dock to set-up course. See Course Set-up section for more information.

12:00PM Captains meeting at the end of dock six to sign-up the racing fleet, (three boats are required) discuss the course arrangement, sailing instructions, signal flags and address any questions.

1:00PM 1st race start.

Race Committee Operations

The race operations can be handled in one of two ways. Self-timed or RC timed. Self-timed races are controlled by the RC who is also racing in the fleet. It is imperative that good radio communication is established with the racing fleet prior to starting the racing sequence as visual signal flags will not be deployed. RC timed races use a manned committee boat that controls starting / finishing line operations. The committee boat Captain should make sure they have a working VHF radio, stop watch or timing device and air horn. Back-ups are a very good idea. The committee boat operations will require at least two people to function correctly.

See Race Operations section for more self-timed and RC timed operations.

Course Set-up

The race course set-up is at the discretion of the race day committee boat Captain. Generally, the race day consists of three races and the course should be set-up so that each race can be completed within one hour. Wind speed will be the key determining factor for how long the course should be. The race committee should be aware of not only the wind speed at the time of course set-up, but the predicted wind speed at the time the races will commence. ALL races will be canceled if winds are greater then 25knts!

Course length per wind speeds should be as follows:

Less than 5 knots of wind = course length of approximately 1.5 to 3.5kn miles

Between 5 and 10 knots of wind = course length of approximately 3.5 to 5kn miles

Greater than 10 knots of wind = course length of approximately 5 to 6kn miles

OOLOGAH LAKE

Starting Line

The course starting line "gate" will consist of a red triangle buoy and the anchored committee boat and should be approximately one boat length "30 feet" for each boat competing wide. A race with six boats should have a starting gate width of no less than 180 feet. The starting line should be perpendicular to the wind. Set anchor with mooring ball for quick committee boat attachment. The mooring ball will serve as the committee boat end of the gate for self-timed RC operations.

"I" Course Diagram

The "I" course is a straight line course with the starting gate acting as an obstruction for the downwind leg.

Triangle Course Diagram

The triangle "T" course is similar to the "I" course, but has another buoy added between the windward and leeward buoys.

Course Modification Diagrams

Both the "I" and "T" courses can be modified to combine or add laps.

Buoy Setting

It is important when setting buoys that the anchor is set and does not drag to ensure the course is not altered by the wind.

Race Operations (Self-Timed)

Pre-Race Operations

The RC will blast air horn three times to warn the racing fleet approximately 30 seconds prior to the 5-minute countdown sequence starting. The air blast should be performed over the radio to ensure all in the racing fleet hear.

Race Start Sequence

The RC will blast air horn one time when it is exactly 5 minutes prior to the race start and again at exactly one minute to the race start and exactly at the race start. The air blast should be performed over the radio to ensure all in the racing fleet hear. It is the responsibility of each race captain in the racing fleet to use their timing devise to record the exact time from the race start air blast till their boat’s bow crosses the finish line.

If any race captain feels they cross the start line prior to the race start they will as soon they can without interfering with the racing fleet drop their boat to last place or return to the start line and restart if all boats in the fleet had not crossed the start line. Any captain that feels a racing fleet boat crossed early they should inform that boats captain as soon as possible of their concern. If a racing captain does not self-impose a penalty, then other racers have the right protest to the RC at the conclusion of races. A time penalty will be assessed if a fault is deemed to have occurred.

Race Finish

Each racing fleet captain shall record their boats elapse time as soon the any portion of the boats standard configuration crosses the finish line after each race and mark on the racing fleet sign-up sheet at the conclusion of all the races for that day. A crew member extending himself, whisker pole or other item ahead of the boats bow will not count as crossing the finish line.

The RC will repeat Race Operations for each race.

Race Operations (RC Timed)

Pre-Race Operations

Once the committee boat is tied to the starting line mooring ball the committee boat crew should perform a radio check with the racing fleet and announce their race start expectations.

An example would be the races will start in 15 minutes or the race start flag sequence will start when all boats reach the starting line area.

The committee boat will blast air horn three times to warn the racing fleet approximately 30 seconds prior to the flag sequence.

Race Start Sequence

The race start sequence requires a timer person who will announce to flag operator when to display the class and preparatory "P" flags as well as blasting the air horn. The flag operator will raise the class flag when the timer announces it is exactly 5 minutes prior to the race start. He will raise the preparatory flag with the class flag when the timer announces it is exactly 4 minutes prior to the race start. He will lower the preparatory flag while keeping the class flag raised when the timer announces it is exactly 1 minute prior to the race start. He will lower the class flag when the timer announces the race start while watching the start line for race start infractions.

The committee boat crew will immediately radio all boats that cross the line early. Those boats will be required to return to the start line prior to continuing the race course. If the committee boat crew is unable to identify all the boats that crossed the line early or if there is an error in the starting procedure then they shall issue a general recall and all boats must return to the start line for a new start sequence.

Race Finish

The committee boat crew shall record each boats elapse time as soon the any portion of the boats standard configuration crosses the finish line after each race on the racing fleet sign-up sheet. A crew member extending himself, whisker pole or other item ahead of the boats bow will not count as crossing the finish line.

The committee boat will repeat Race Operations for each race.

Rules

This section will list the racing rules use by the Spindrift Sailing Club and is followed by a Rules Chart illustration. It is not meant to be inclusive, but generally the rules required by the club for sailing in close proximately to other boats. Racing Captains should read the US Sailing "The Racing Rules of Sailing" for more specific information.

Right of Way

Rule 10 Opposite Tacks

Port tack boat will stay clear of Starboard tack boat.

Rule 11 On the Same Tack, Overlapped

The windward boat will stay clear of the leeward boat.

Rule 12 On the Same Tack, NOT Overlapped

The boat clear astern will stay clear of the boat ahead.

Rule 13 While Tacking

A tacking boat will keep clear of other boats until they have established a close hauled course.

General Limitations

Rule 14 Avoid Contact

The give way boat shall give way when hailed to do so. However, the right of way boat shall avoid a collision if it is clear the give way boat is holding course. The Captain can protest the event after the races are complete with the RC.

Rule 15 Acquiring Right of Way

After a boat acquires the right of way the boat shall allow the other boats time to stay clear.

Rule 16 Changing Course

A right of way boat shall announce intent to change course and allow others to stay clear.

Rule 17 On Same Tack – Proper Course

A boat clear astern becomes overlapped within two of her hulls lengths to leeward of a boat they shall not sail above her proper course.

Marks and Obstructions

Rule 18.1 Application of Rule 18

Rule 18 applies between boats when they are required to leave a mark on the same side and at least one of them is in the zone. However, it does not apply

a. Between boats on opposite tacks on a beat to windward,

b. Between boats on opposite tacks when the proper course at the mark for one but not both of them is to tack,

c. Between a boat approaching a mark and one leaving it, or

d. If the mark is continuing obstruction, in which case rule 19 applies.

Rule 18.2 Giving Mark-Room

a. When boats are overlapped the outside boat shall give the inside boat mark-room, unless rule 18.2 (b) applies.

b. If boats are overlapped when the first of them reaches the zone, the outside boat at that moment shall thereafter give the inside boat mark-room. If a boat is clear ahead when she reaches the zone, the clear astern boat shall give mark-room.

c. When a boat is required to give mark-room by rule 18.2 (b),

1. she shall continue to do so even if later an overlap is broken or a new overlap begins;

2. if she becomes overlapped inside the boat entitled to mark-room, she shall also give that boat room to sail her proper course while they remain overlapped.

However, if the boat entitled to mark-room passes head to wind or leaves the zone, rule 18.2 (b) ceases to apply.

d. If there is reasonable doubt that a boat obtained or broke an overlap in time, it shall be presumed that she did not.

e. If a boat obtained an inside overlap from clear astern or by tacking to windward of the other boat and, from the time the overlap began, the outside boat has been unable to give mark-room, she is not required to give it.

Rule 18.3 Tacking in the Zone

If a boat in the zone passes head wind and is then on the same tack as a boat that is fetching the mark, rule18.2 does not thereafter apply between them. The boat that changed tack

a. shall not cause the other to sail above close-hauled to avoid contact or prevent the other boat from passing the mark on the required side, and

b. shall give mark-room if the other boat becomes overlapped inside her.

Rule 18.4 Gybing

When an inside overlapping right of way boat must gybe at a mark to sail her proper course, until she gybes she shall sail no farther from the mark than needed to sail that course. Rule 18.4 does not apply to gate mark.

Rule 19 Room to Pass an Obstruction

Rule 19.1 Application of Rule 19

Rule 19 applies between boats at an obstruction except when it is also a mark the boats are required to leave on the same side. However, at a continuing obstruction, rule 19 always applies and rule 18 does not.

Rule 19.2 Giving Room at an Obstruction

a. a right of way boat may choose to pass an obstruction on either side.

b. when boats are overlapped, the outside boat shall give the inside boat room between her and the obstruction, unless she has been unable to do so from the time the overlap began.

c. while boats are passing a continuing obstruction, if a boat that was clear astern and required to keep clear becomes overlapped between the other boat and the obstruction and, at the moment the overlap begins, there is not room for her to pass between them, she is not entitled to room under rule 19.2 (b). While the boats remain overlapped, she shall keep clear and rules 10 and 11 do not apply.

Rule 20 Room to Tack at an Obstruction

Rule 20.1 Hailing

When approaching an obstruction, a boat may hail for room to tack and avoid a boat on the same tack. However, she shall not hail if

a. she can avoid the obstruction safely without making a substantial course change,

b. she is sailing below a close-hauled, or

c. the obstruction is a mark and a boat that is fetching it would be required to respond and changes course.

Rule 20.2 Responding

a. after a boat hails, she shall give the hailed boat time to respond.

b. the hailed boat shall respond even if the hail breaks rule 20.1.

c. the hailed boat shall respond either by tacking as soon as possible, or by immediately replying "You Tack" and then giving the hailing boat room to tack and avoid her.

d. when the hailed boat responds, the hailing boat shall tack as soon as possible.

e. from the time a boat hails until she has tacked and avoided the hailed boat, rule 18.2 does not apply between them.

Rule 20.3 Passing on a Hail to an Additional Boat

When a boat has been hailed to room to tack and she intends to respond by tacking, she mail hail another boat on the same tack for room to tack and avoid her. She may even if her hail does not meet the conditions of rule 20.1. Rule 20.2 applies between her and the boat she hails.

Rule 21 Exoneration

When a boat is sailing within the room or mark-room to which she in entitled under rule, she shall be exonerated if, in an incident with a boat required to give her that room or mark-room,

a. she breaks a rule 15 or rule 16, or

b. she is compelled to break rule 31.

Other Rules

Rule 22 Starting Errors; Taking Penalties; Moving Astern

Rule 22.1

A boat sailing towards the pre-start side of the starting line or one of its extensions after her starting signal to start or to comply with rule 30.1 shall keep clear of a boat not doing so until she is completely on the pre-start side.

Rule 22.2

A boat taking a penalty shall stay clear of a one that is not.

Rule 22.3

A boat moving astern through the water by backing a sail shall keep clear of one that is not.

Rule 31 Touching a Mark

While racing, a boat shall not touch a starting mark before starting, a mark that begins, bounds or ends the leg of the course on which she is sailing, or a finishing mark after finishing.

Club Rules

1. All boats in the racing fleet must meet Oklahoma boating safety requirements.

2. All boats in the racing fleet will have a working VFH radio.

3. All racing Captains and crew will wear a PFD when the winds are greater than 15knts or when the racing committee deems it necessary.

4. Any boat can reduce sail at any time, but cannot increase sail until after the race is over.

5. Any boat that has been modified from its factory standard to improve its performance shall have its handicap adjusted.

Penalties

Starting Line Penalty

All boats that are self-identified or identified by the committee boat as crossing the start line prior to the race start shall return to the pre-start side of line as soon as possible without interfering with other boats and restart.

Rules 10 through 22

A boat that has broken one or more rules in an incident shall complete a two-turn penalty without interfering with other boats prior to finishing the race.

Rule 31

A boat that touches a starting mark prior to the race start or any mark along the course after the race start shall complete a one-turn penalty without interfering with other boats prior to finishing the race.

Club Rules

Any boat breaking a club rule shall be disqualified from the race.

After Race Penalty

If a boat wishes to be assessed a penalty after the race is completed, but before a protest is submitted to the RC, a 20%-time penalty will be added to the elapse time.

If a protest is submitted to the RC, and the protested boat is not exonerated after a review of the incident and applicable rules then a 30%-time penalty will be added to the elapse time.

After Races

The Rear Commodore will host a mini social after each race day races for racers and club members. The club will provide picnic type entrée and attendees are encouraged to bring sides.

The Vice Commodore will address any unsettled rules infractions that occurred outside the starting line area or committee boat direct view.

Scoring

The committee boat will turn in the racing fleet sign-up sheet with the recorded elapse times or scoring abbreviation for each boat for each race to the Vice Commodore.

Scoring abbreviations

DNF = Did not Finish

DNS = Did not Start

FIP = Finished in Place

The Vice Commodore will apply any after race penalties to the elapse times and note each boats non-handicapped finishing place.

The Vice Commodore will apply each boats listed handicap to correct the boats elapse + penalty time and note each boats finishing place.

CT = Correct Time

PT = Penalty Time

HC = Handicap or D-PN number listed for boat after modification adjustments

CT = ((ET + PT) X 100) / HC

Low Point Scoring

The Spindrift Sailing Club uses the Low Point System to determine race finish place and race day finish place.

CT Finishing Place Points

First 1

Second 2

Third 3

Each place thereafter Add 1 point

FIP Total number of boats in race

DNF Total number of boats in race + 1

DNS Total number of boats in race + 2

Series Scoring

Each boat’s series score shall be the total of her race scores excluding her worse score providing her Captain served on committee boat during the series.